HomeTagcanadian Archives - Immigration Lawyer Vancouver, Canada | Sas & Ing Immigration Law Centre

Canadian work experience is often the key necessity to qualifying for permanent residence in Canada. While several other features are important – such as foreign education and foreign work experience along with language proficiency, Canadian work experience is highly significant. Having practiced immigration law for over 30 years and employed many new and aspiring Canadian immigrants, I would like to share my observations. Currently, many Canadian businesses are struggling to find workers and our office is no exception. We are frequently searching for office administrators and/or legal assistants – two occupations that are amongst the most common as the basis for applying for permanent residence. As an employer and immigration lawyer, I would like to provide some insights to securing that vital Canadian employment on your immigration journey.

As a part of the Trudeau government’s 2022 Budget, Parliament passed new legislation prohibiting non-Canadians from purchasing residential property in Canada. The Prohibition on the Purchase of Residential Property by Non-Canadians Act received royal assent on June 23, 2022 and will come into effect on January 1, 2023, lasting for a period of two years. The introduction of the bill is in keeping with one of the Federal Government’s primary goals for this year’s budget which was to stabilize the housing market and provide more affordable housing to Canadians amidst record-high inflation rates and sky-rocketing housing prices.

As an immigration lawyer I regularly speak with clients who are interested in applying for visas and permits to come to Canada. For many clients the first step of arriving in Canada represents an exciting new chapter; however, after arriving in Canada many clients are not fully aware about the conditions that are imposed on their stay, which can jeopardize their long-term future in Canada if they run afoul of Canadian immigration laws. In this article I will explore some of the ways that both immigration applicants and the Department of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) can reduce the likelihood that a person in Canada will unintentionally break immigration laws.

As immigration lawyers we are often consulted by individuals for a wide array of immigration processes where their current status is expiring imminently - like today or tomorrow! There are also people who come to us AFTER their status has already expired. There are ways of fixing most things, but not all things. Which raises the question….When is the best time to apply to renew my status?

On April 4, 2022 the Department of Employment and Social Development Canada (“ESDC”) announced sweeping new Temporary Foreign Worker Program ("TFWP") policies that will make it easier for Canadian employers to hire temporary foreign workers (“TFWs”) through the Labour Market Impact Assessment (“LMIA”) process. These policies come on the heels of strong economic reports showing that the Canadian economy has rebounded from the worst effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and that there is currently a high job vacancy rate in the country. Let’s review the three major changes that every employer needs to know!

On July 19, 2021 the Public Health Agency of Canada announced plans to fully reopen Canada’s borders to international travellers by September 7, 2021. This inspiring news reflects the fact that more than 75% of our adult population has received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and over 50% are fully vaccinated.

As we reach the end of 2020, the effects of COVID-19 on Canadian immigration levels has become apparent: the Department of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has not processed and approved as many permanent residency applications as it expected to in 2020. In many cases, existing permanent residency applications will not be finalized in 2020 because of COVID-19 related shutdowns slowing down IRCC’s standard processing speed and preventing applicants from meeting basic immigration requirements such as obtaining police clearance results or completing biometrics (fingerprinting) enrolment.

The Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship (IRCC) has been busy making changes to Canada’s family reunification programs in December. In consecutive weeks during this holiday season the Minister has announced important changes to how sponsorship applications for spouses and parents and grandparents will be made in the new year. These changes will affect many families, since the Minister has already announced earlier in October this year that his department expects to admit 84,000 new family members to Canada as permanent residents in 2017.

Sas and Ing Immigration Law Centre LLP

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