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As a part of the Trudeau government’s 2022 Budget, Parliament passed new legislation prohibiting non-Canadians from purchasing residential property in Canada. The Prohibition on the Purchase of Residential Property by Non-Canadians Act received royal assent on June 23, 2022 and will come into effect on January 1, 2023, lasting for a period of two years. The introduction of the bill is in keeping with one of the Federal Government’s primary goals for this year’s budget which was to stabilize the housing market and provide more affordable housing to Canadians amidst record-high inflation rates and sky-rocketing housing prices.

On April 4, 2022 the Department of Employment and Social Development Canada (“ESDC”) announced sweeping new Temporary Foreign Worker Program ("TFWP") policies that will make it easier for Canadian employers to hire temporary foreign workers (“TFWs”) through the Labour Market Impact Assessment (“LMIA”) process. These policies come on the heels of strong economic reports showing that the Canadian economy has rebounded from the worst effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and that there is currently a high job vacancy rate in the country. Let’s review the three major changes that every employer needs to know!

We live in a world where almost any information is right at our fingertips. With a click of a few buttons on the internet we can learn about any subject matter that interests us. Despite these modern conveniences, the ease with which we can access information comes at a cost: information is so readily accessible that we aren’t sure what information is real and reliable and what isn’t. When it comes to Canadian immigration law, readers of the official government immigration website should take a cautious approach when reviewing the information that is made available.

As we reach the end of 2020, the effects of COVID-19 on Canadian immigration levels has become apparent: the Department of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has not processed and approved as many permanent residency applications as it expected to in 2020. In many cases, existing permanent residency applications will not be finalized in 2020 because of COVID-19 related shutdowns slowing down IRCC’s standard processing speed and preventing applicants from meeting basic immigration requirements such as obtaining police clearance results or completing biometrics (fingerprinting) enrolment.

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